Change Harvesting

My Direction Forward

Here’s a thing that happens: “We tried your advice by not trying your advice except partly where we did what we want but gave it your labels and it didn’t work and therefore you are wrong.” Now, if you’ve given that advice for many years, and followed it in your own endeavors, and you, your teams, and many others have succeeded with it, what are you to make of such a statement? Well. Let’s not hedge, the world has too …

My Direction Forward Go to Post »

Frames in the Software Trade: An Example

We’ve talked about frames adding up to worldviews adding up to cultures, but it all feels pretty vague in its possible importance. We need some informal sense of how this works in practice. In the immortal words of Brian Marick, “an example would be handy right about now.” Continuous Integration (CI) is the practice of frequently cycling code through the source vault. People practicing CI do this several times a day. In “git” terms, they both pull/merge/push, depending on language …

Frames in the Software Trade: An Example Go to Post »

The Kontentment Project

I am in a mood of 1) wanting to geek out a little, and 2) wanting to concretize some key ideas from change-harvesting for my fellow geeks. To do that, I need to give you a sketch of the kontentment project, a desktop app I wrote and use in making videos. The source for kontentment is here: Kontentment – GeePawHill on GitHub I don’t particularly recommend you download it or try to run it. You won’t need to for these …

The Kontentment Project Go to Post »

The Cost of Changing Microtests

The “How I Work (Test-Driving Mix)” drew some questions and comment. How I Work (Test-Driving Mix) Here’s one: a respondent says, “If I write a lot of small tests and I change how a feature works, I have to change or throw out all those microtests, which is a lot of work.” (The respondent proposed an answer for this problem, and it’s not a bad one, but raises some other questions we might get to later.) The one-liner response: “For …

The Cost of Changing Microtests Go to Post »

Frames: Build, Race, and More

Well, Change-Harvesters, I want so badly to connect up the dots from these previous muses about the topic and tie them back to the concrete realities of professional software development. But I can’t. Yet. I can’t yet. We have just a little further to go. When we talked about “if all you have is a hammer”, we mentioned frames, and I mentioned Race, Build, and More, but then we kept right on going. I want to circle back now, because …

Frames: Build, Race, and More Go to Post »

Change-Harvesting: The How

The central concept of a dynamic unity is change-harvesting: make a change, harvest its value, use that value to make another change, over and over, change after change, world without end. We spoke the other day about how tools shape *problems*. “If all you have is a hammer, all you will see are nails.” It was a conversation about *mental* tools: frames, worldviews, culture. My contention is that our trade’s standard frames, worldviews, and culture are failing us, and that …

Change-Harvesting: The How Go to Post »

Change-Harvesting and the Dynamic Unity

Reframing ourselves around change-harvesting involves several important concepts or concept-clusters. Maybe the most basic of these is the idea of a “dynamic unity”. Let’s go there. We call a thing a “unity” because we experience it as a whole thing. It has an inside and an outside and a border. It might be made up of other parts, other unities, even, and the border might actively exchange parts from outside & inside, but still we see it as a whole …

Change-Harvesting and the Dynamic Unity Go to Post »

Scroll to Top